Are masks effective against coronavirus?

Unchallenged

Used surgical masks that are disposed of improperly can increase the risk of coronavirus spreading

Because surgical masks are designed to keep infections from spreading (by trapping droplets from the wearer), used masks can become laden with coronavirus. If these virus-carrying masks are disposed of improperly (e.g. outside of a hospital setting), they can infect others.

Top Source

Unchallenged

Masks may be effective at protecting people from COVID-19, as long as they're not reused

A 2006 report by the US National Academy of Sciences discourages the reuse of masks because the hazardous buildup of harmful particles within the mesh, cannot be cleaned out without damaging the fibres or other components of the device (such as the straps or nose clip).

Top Source

Most Validated

A study found that SARS-CoV-2 (coronavirus) remained stable in the air for several hours, suggesting the illness could be hampered by masks.

A team of researchers blasted virus-laden fluids into a rotating cylinder to create an aerosolised cloud of air, and found that the virus remained stable for several hours within that cloud, raising fears about its ability to persist in ambient air.

Top Source

Less Validated

The study that involved blasting virus-laden fluids into a rotating cylinder to create aerosol clouds was done under artificial conditions

Saskia Popescu of George Mason University said the study doesn’t reflect “what’s occurring when you’re just walking down the street," and is “...more akin to medically invasive procedures like intubation... [which] are unique to the healthcare setting."

Top Source

The fight against misinformation needs a hero like you.

Add your views to this topic by signing up. You’ll also be able to add or vote on sources, and start new topics. Because if you don’t fight misinformation, who will?

Unchallenged

Masks can prevent the spread of coronavirus, even if they don't protect the wearer from contracting it.

Lydia Bourouiba, an associate professor at MIT, has researched the dynamics of exhalations and found that exhalations cause gaseous clouds that can travel up to 27 feet (8.2 meters). Masks can reduce the distance travelled by gaseous clouds and the amount of droplets in them.

Top Source

Most Validated
Less Validated
Most Validated
Less Validated

The fight against misinformation needs a hero like you.

Add your views to this topic by signing up. You’ll also be able to add or vote on sources, and start new topics. Because if you don’t fight misinformation, who will?

Unchallenged
Unchallenged
Unchallenged

The fight against misinformation needs a hero like you.

Add your views to this topic by signing up. You’ll also be able to add or vote on sources, and start new topics. Because if you don’t fight misinformation, who will?

Unchallenged
Unchallenged
Unchallenged

The fight against misinformation needs a hero like you.

Add your views to this topic by signing up. You’ll also be able to add or vote on sources, and start new topics. Because if you don’t fight misinformation, who will?

Unchallenged
Unchallenged
Most Validated
Less Validated

The fight against misinformation needs a hero like you.

Add your views to this topic by signing up. You’ll also be able to add or vote on sources, and start new topics. Because if you don’t fight misinformation, who will?

Unchallenged